Tuesday, January 5, 2021

IWSG: The Instant Gratification Sexagenarian

                                   



It's time for the first 2021 edition of the  Insecure Writer's Support Group. Happy New Year to all! Be sure to visit Alex J. Cavanaugh  and the rest of the talented bloggers who are always willing to lend a helping hand.  

January 6 optional question - Being a writer, when you're reading someone else's work, what stops you from finishing a book/throws you out of the story/frustrates you the most about other people's books?

Since the Covid outbreak, I've had more free time than ever; yet, I've become even less patient. For example, choosing a book and actually reading it from cover to cover has become more of a rarity. 

If the story doesn't reel me in right away, I throw it overboard in favor of binge watching a star-studded mini series on TV. 

Does my intense desire for instant gratification mean that I'm turning into a millennial disguised in Golden Girl clothing with a beauty shop hairdo?

Is it unreasonable for someone who takes over an hour to complete her nightly brushing and flossing ritual to want to feel some emotion for one of the main characters by the end of the first chapter? Indifference is not our friend.

I'd rather wonder what makes this woman so atrocious, or is this guy really as innocent as he seems, then when is this chapter going to end? And with my new gnat-like attention span, long chapters are my kryptonite. 

There's something satisfying about finishing a chapter at bedtime, and looking forward to delving into a new chapter with endless possibilities the following day. 

Though writers often spend years researching, writing and editing their manuscripts, many readers benefit in even more ways than they realize. The chance to settle in with a good book, is one of the best means of escape particularly during the pandemic, and the IWSG has many of you to thank for that.

I appreciate having the opportunity to share my two cents which is practically worthless, as the penny will soon be obsolete. 



10 comments:

  1. My attention span has waned during this Covid time also. Nah, truth be told, it has been waning for years (like everything else about me). The first chapter has to grab me and if not, I feel the need to take a nap. It helps if it is in e-book form as I can change the size of the font and the brightness to keep me awake. I’m old.

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  2. The penny should be obsolete.
    I think as we age we realize how short life is and who wants to waste it on books that aren't great?

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  3. I agree. If a book doesn't grab me right away, I don't invest my time and attention in it. And we've already abolished pennies in Canada. In my opinion, nickels and dimes should go next.

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  4. Hi Julie - great to see you ... always love your take on life. I have to say I have quite a few books scattered around - all started, but which to pick up and finish, which do I need to 'do something' with ... I hope it's the covid brain - but not sure! Lots going on ... my pet peeve is if I'm reading a novel and it has a bad ending ... ie I've enjoyed the story - now I want to know how it finishes ... it then fizzles out ... really puts me off the author.

    Sadly if we get rid of the pennies, nickels and dimes everything will cost an arm and a leg - on the other hand cash seems to have almost gone by the board ... I do pay the newsagent in cash - the rest is by swiping.

    Stay safe and take care - all the best - Hilary

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  5. Arleen - I also like reading e-books, or large print editions, as I can only wear my reading glasses for short intervals. You look great, and you're sharpness, creativity and sense of fun are impressive at any age. Though having the Internet at our fingertips is a wonderful gift, it's probably affected everyone's attention span to some extent. Thank you, Arleen!

    Alex - I wholeheartedly agree about your thoughts on pennies and books. Thanks for all you do for the IWSG, Alex!

    Debra - Yes, change is more of a nuisance now than ever. But I still feel guilty when I see a small coin on the street and don't bend down to pick it up like my dear grandma always did. Thanks Debra!

    Hilary - It's always great to see you too! We recently dropped off a few bundles of barely read books at our local library. Funny about having a "Covid brain," though I think a lot of us have slowed down a bit. I agree that it's even more frustrating to read through a long book only to find a disappointing ending. I had the opposite experience the other night. I sat through a slow and depressing 90 minute movie with an award-winning director, only to find that the ending was the most clever part of the story. I also rarely pay with cash anymore. Thank you and hope you stay safe too. Sorry that you're back on lockdown again. You are such a trooper, Hilary!

    Julie

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  6. I appreciate your frankness, Julie. Yes, the story has to get going quickly, with a hook and something we connect with. Most readers are impatient, editors and publishers even more so.

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    1. Rosemary - I can't imagine all the pressure book authors are under. I admire their dedication and perseverance. Thank you, Rosemary!

      Julie

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  7. Yep, life is short. Read only good books. But when you are done, read another one.

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    1. Liza - Wise words made more sublime with a catchy rhyme! Thanks Liza!

      Julie

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  8. thanks for popping up on my blog and saying hello. I'll hang in pretty long on a book, but I tend to vet what I'm going to read by seeing reviews or having recommendations from friends. I don't often wing it with something I'm unprepared for - that helps in not being disappointed. Good post and glad you are well. Take care

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